Tag Archives: mint

Lebanese Warm Lentils

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Lebanese Warm Lentils

Surprise! More Lentils!

Are you surprised?

Neither am I. I just love these little guys! They are packed with all sorts of good-for-you stuff, and just happen to be delicious. These buttery little beans (beans? they are in the bean family, right?) are about as versatile to cook with as they are easy to make. They are also incredibly inexpensive, particular if you buy them in the bulk section.

Lebanese Warm Lentils from If Looks Could Kale

Actually, the first time I ever bought lentils was last fall when I used them as part of my “autumn decor” (if you could even call it that). I bought yellow and red lentils, then just layered them in some mason jars with a candle in the middle. I only started cooking with lentils about six weeks ago!

Speaking of fall, I’ve been trying to ignore the fact that my beautiful morning light will be going away soon but soon I’ll have to face facts and figure out a method other than getting up at the crack of dawn to take photographs of my recipes. Do you have any ideas?

Also, I just confirmed the legume-status on Wikipedia, so at least we have that part down.

So, tell me. Why haven’t you jumped on the lentil bandwagon yet? Do you dislike protein? Fiber? B-Vitamins? Do I sound like your mother yet?

Just get with the program. Cheap, fast, delicious, and healthy. That should check off just about every item on your list.

Oh, lentils. You complete me.

Lebanese Warm Lentils from If Looks Could Kale

Let’s get cooking.

Makes: 4 main dish servings, or 6-8 side dish servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 c. dried Brown Lentils
  • 8 cloves Garlic
  • 2 Tbsp. Grapeseed Oil
  • 1/2 c. fresh Parsley (Curly or Italian)
  • 1/4 c. fresh Mint Leaves
  • 1 c. Arugula Leaves
  • 3 Tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed Lemon Juice
  • 2 tsp. Cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. Allspice
  • 1/2 tsp. Salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ground Black Pepper

Directions:

  1. Measure out your lentils, place them in a fine mesh strainer or colander, and rinse with cold water. Sort through the lentils to pick out any stones or debris which may be left behind.
  2. Place the rinsed lentils in a medium sauce pan and add 2 cups of water. Bring the water to a rapid simmer over medium-high heat. The water should be moving, but it shouldn’t be a full-on rolling boil. Turn the heat down to medium-low and cook for between 20 and 30 minutes. You want the water to maintain a soft simmer.
  3. Meanwhile, finely mince 8 cloves of garlic in a food processor (or use a sharp knife). Heat the grapeseed oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until a small piece of garlic sizzles at once when tossed into the pan. Reduce the heat to medium-low and add all of the minced garlic. Saute until the garlic is golden brown and crispy (about 6 to 8 minutes). Set aside.
  4. Chop up your fresh parsley, mint, and arugula. Set aside.
  5. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, allspice, salt, and pepper.
  6. Once the lentils are tender, remove from heat and drain any excess liquid. Return them to the pan and add the crispy garlic along with the mixture of olive oil, lemon juice, and seasonings. Toss well to coat.
  7. Fold in the fresh parsley, mint, and arugula. Taste and adjust salt and pepper as needed.
  8. Serve warm, accompanied by pita bread, or as a side dish with buttery cod (highly recommended!)

Lebanese Warm Lentils from If Looks Could Kale

Nutrition (per main course serving, or 1/4 of the recipe):

335 calories, 18 g. fat, 13 g. protein, 32 g. carbs, 15 g. fiber. WW PointsPlus: 8

Recipe Adapted from Saveur Magazine, September 2012

Broiled Grapefruit with Toasted Coconut & Mint

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Broiled Grapefruit with Toasted Coconut & Mint

Morning, friends!

Just a quick and dirty little recipe today – broiled grapefruit with toasted coconut and mint.

In Thailand I remember having a cool salad in the afternoon made with grapefruit, mint, and coconut. I made this easy little breakfast the other day with the same flavor profiles and thought it was delicious!

gfruit2I simply turned on the broiler, segmented a grapefruit, then placed the grapefruit halves and coconut flakes under the broiler until toasted. Keep an eye on your coconut, it toasts up fast!

I sliced up some fresh mint to go on top and had myself a nice little breakfast.

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Dig in!

 

What quick go-to breakfasts do you make? Have you ever tried salt on your grapefruit?

Moroccan Mint Tea

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Moroccan Mint Tea

In an attempt to use up the massive amount of mint I purchased at the Farmer’s Market last week, I decided to make homemade Moroccan Mint Tea to go with the Moroccan Lentil Soup.

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This was so simple I was shocked that it never before occurred to me to make mint tea from fresh leaves.

mntt6Essentially I just boiled water, added some mint leaves, let it steep, then added sugar.

mntt4This was so delicious I drank four cups and then couldn’t sleep because of the sugar. It complimented my soup perfectly and was wonderfully refreshing. Plus, it was a great way to use up some of those mint leaves!

Here’s the recipe:

Makes: 4 Cups

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cups water
  • 20 mint leaves
  • 3 Tbsp. Sugar

Directions:

  1. Boil water.
  2. Reduce to simmer, add mint leaves, wait five minutes.
  3. Strain mint leaves.
  4. Add sugar, stir, pour into cups.
  5. Drink it.

I told you it was easy, right?

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This is definitely going to become a regular thing at our house.

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Nutrition (per serving):

36 calories, 0 g. fat, 42 g. protein, 9 g. carbs, 0 g. fiber. WW PointsPlus: 1

Brazilian Mojito

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Brazilian Mojito

As promised, here is my recipe for a delicious and refreshing drink to go along with yesterday’s Poblano Chicken Tacos with Pipicha.

I’ve dubbed it the “Brazilian Mojito” simply because it’s a fusion of a classic mojito and Brazil’s national cocktail, the Caipirinha.

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The husband and I honeymooned in Brazil last September and sipped Caipirinhas like they were going out of style. We also camped out in a grocery store to borrow some WiFi so we could look up how many ounces of liquor we could stash in our suitcases and still make it through airport security.

The Caipirinha is made from Brazil’s national liquor, Cachaça, which is similar to rum but made with cane sugar instead of molasses. We brought back a few bottles of Cachaça and have been slowly working through them, saving this sweet nectar for special occasions and worthy dinners. You can purchase Cachaça at lots of liquor stores here in the U.S. – try asking at the counter if you can’t find it.

A Caipirinha  is made by muddling lots of fresh lime wedges with sugar, then topped off with Cachaça and ice. If it sounds like a strong drink, that’s because it is. Really strong. And full of sugar, which makes for a fun morning the day after you’ve had a few.

I played off this basic formula by incorporating some mint I picked up at the Farmer’s Market, and a splash of triple sec as a substitute for some of the plain sugar to add a bit more flavor.

Here’s the recipe:

Makes: 1 “Brazilian Mojito”

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. Cachaça (subsitute rum if you can’t find it)
  • 1 oz. Triple Sec
  • 10 fresh mint leaves
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar (brown sugar works nicely, too)
  • 1/2 lime, cut into 6 wedges
  • Ice
  • Water (I used still, but sparkling would be lovely, too)

Directions:

  1. Using a muddler (or the back of a wooden spoon), work the mint leaves and sugar together in the bottom of a rocks glass. When you think you’re done, muddle it for another 30 seconds. You want it really, really, muddly.
  2. Throw in the lime wedges and muddle for another 60 seconds. Muddle, muddle, muddle.
  3. Fill the glass with ice, and pour the Cachaça and triple sec in over the top. Top it off with water and give it a few swirls with a stir stick. Alternatively, you can make this in a cocktail shaker and pour the whole thing over ice, but I just didn’t see the sense in dirtying another dish.
  4. Garnish with an extra lime wedge, and drink up!

Brazilian Mojito 1